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 Motors/Gearing/Drivetrain
 gear mods for ezip e-900
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mikegerard
Starting Member




7 Posts

Posted - 05/28/2009 :  10:54:13  Show Profile
Hi everyone...

I have an ezip e-900
http://ezipusa.com/10-ezip-900.html
that I am trying to mod. The thing has a ton of acceleration but the top speed is around 14-15 mph. I think that I can change the gearing and give up on some acceleration and get a higher top speed.

So here are my questions....
How hard is it to change out the gear by the motor? I think the one there has 11 teeth. I think a simple change to a 13-15 teeth gear would give me adequate acceleration and higher top speed.

How do I find out what replacement gear I should buy? It seems like there are many types/brands out there.

Thanks in advance,
Mike

SiriusFun
Journeyman Modder

Lakewood
Colorado



293 Posts

Posted - 05/28/2009 :  11:51:57  Show Profile
Mike,

You're correct. You will sacrifice acceleration in your chase toward more speed (unless you increase power).

Replacement motor sprockets are available from electric scooter parts supply stores online. Here's one example:

http://www.electricscooterparts.com/sprockets.html

Make sure you buy the correct "bore" (shaft diameter of the motor)and the correct "pitch" (#25). A 15-tooth freewheel clutch is available, but it may rub on the 3.0 inch tires. When you increase the number of teeth on the front sprocket, you may also need to add a link (or more) of #25 roller chain.

Another option is to increase the voltage. Adding a third battery in series will give you 36V and more speed. Your stock 24V controller will "probably" handle the 36V, but you assume the risk that it may also burn-out. 36V controllers for brushed motors are widely available and are not terribly expensive. Your existing motor will more than likely do fine with the increase in voltage. On a very hot day, if you are running full throttle up-hill for any length of time. the motor may get VERY hot and possibly self-destruct. When in those types of riding, it's a good idea to occasionally do a motor "touch test".

Hope some of this helps.

Edited by - SiriusFun on 05/28/2009 11:55:11
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jtotheace
Moderator

Charleston
South Carolina
USA



442 Posts

Posted - 05/28/2009 :  16:10:48  Show Profile
Hi and welcome to the forum you guys!
Great first post SiriusFun I think you nailed it. x2
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mikegerard
Starting Member




7 Posts

Posted - 05/29/2009 :  02:32:22  Show Profile
Thanks for the input!

I think I'll get some measurements on the motor gear so that I'm sure that I have the correct bore.

Having a little less acceleration will actually be a plus for me. My middle son really likes the scooter but is afraid of it because it accelerates too fast. He'll ride it more if it accelerates more slowly. He never gets it up to it's current top speed anyway (that's more for me :)

Thanks,
Mike
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mikegerard
Starting Member




7 Posts

Posted - 06/04/2009 :  10:40:54  Show Profile
Is there a way I can figure out the sprocket without taking it off.

I'm looking for a 13 or 15 tooth sprocket for an ezip 900 scooter.
It uses this motor.
http://www.monsterscooterparts.com/24-volt-900-watt-electric-motor-11-tooth-chain-sprocket.html

I think I need to figure out the bore but is there anything else I need to know?

Thanks,
Mike
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SiriusFun
Journeyman Modder

Lakewood
Colorado



293 Posts

Posted - 06/04/2009 :  15:02:00  Show Profile
The only other thing to consider is "How" the sprocket attaches to the motor shaft. There are D-Bore, Double-D Bore, Splined, and hubs with set screws. The ususal Currie motor shaft is 8MM, but it wouldn't hurt to sneak a thin caliper back there and check the shaft between the sprocket and the motor if there's enough gap. You'll want a sprocket with a hub and set screw(s). Make sure it's aligned with the rear sprocket before you tighten it down onto the motor shaft. And don't forget that you may need to do something with your chain as well.

The link I posted above is a good source for 8MM Bore; #25 Pitch; 11-16 Tooth motor sprockets.
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mikegerard
Starting Member




7 Posts

Posted - 07/04/2009 :  06:10:00  Show Profile
I took the motor off and measured it and it looks like I need a sprocket with a 10mm bore.

Does anyone know where I can find sprockets with 10mm bores? These guys have a ton of sprockets but none with the right bore...
http://www.electricscooterparts.com/sprockets.html

Thanks in advance,
Mike
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SiriusFun
Journeyman Modder

Lakewood
Colorado



293 Posts

Posted - 07/04/2009 :  11:37:33  Show Profile
Mike,

Have you removed the sprocket from the motor shaft? It may have a "step" in the shaft down to 8MM.
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BrandonB
Starting Member

Shelby
NC
USA

9 Posts

Posted - 07/05/2009 :  16:27:44  Show Profile  Visit BrandonB's Homepage
The shaft is stepped down. To get the sprocket off, you'll have to remove the pin near the inside of the sprocket. Here is a 15T roller clutch that will work with your motor. Shipping and Handling is $6 flat so you won't be charged more for anything else you buy. Search "scooter" and "bicycle" to see what else they have.

http://www.allelectronics.com/make-a-store/item/CH-8/ROLLER-CLUTCH-W/-15-TOOTH-SPROCKET/1.html

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mikegerard
Starting Member




7 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2009 :  04:34:23  Show Profile
I bought a roller clutch and tried to put it on but it wont fit. The clutch rubs the wheel (the roller clutch sticks out more).

I compared the clutch position with an older ezip scooter I have and noticed that the rear wheel assembly is not symmetric. On the newer scooter the tire is very close to the chain (maybe half an inch). On the older scooter the tire further from the chain (maybe an inch).

So I think my next step is to try to take the wheel off and see if I can flip it so that the tire is further from the chain. Then there should be plenty of room for the new sprocket. I'll get this thing figured out eventually!

Mike
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SiriusFun
Journeyman Modder

Lakewood
Colorado



293 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2009 :  05:43:45  Show Profile
Mike,

I'm not surprised about the roller clutch rubbing. I mentioned it in my post above from May 28th.

Do you have the same size tires on both scooters? The newer ones use fatter (3.0") tires and the older ones use 2.25".

Looks like this scooter has a disc front brake, and no rear brake! Be very careful when stopping from a higher speed, or you might land on your nose.

The stock Currie sprocket screws onto the cast wheel on the right side. If you flip it around, the sprocket will be on the left and you will have no way to fasten it onto the right side.

The simplest solution would be to use a standard motor sprocket (no freewheel) like it was originally, only with a greater number of teeth than stock to get lower acceleration. If you really want freewheeling, you will have to remove the stock wheel sprocket which screws onto the wheel and can be a bear to remove without destroying anything, and then replace the screw-on sprocket with a freewheel hub and then a bolt-on rear sprocket.

I'd be trying to figure a way to add a rear brake before I worried about gear ratios.

Keep us updated. Thanks.




Edited by - SiriusFun on 07/27/2009 06:17:33
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mikegerard
Starting Member




7 Posts

Posted - 07/28/2009 :  16:25:10  Show Profile
I ran into many problems but was able to make it work.

First, I took the old sprocket off and found out that the shaft is 10mm with no step down. The new 15 tooth sprocket is 10mm with a step down to 8mm. Fortunately I bought an extra motor with the 15 tooth sprocket from allelectronics, just to have a spare.

The next problem I ran into was that the sprocket touched the wheel. Again fortunately I was able to take off the rear sprocket and switch sides. I tried to do it before but thought it was a permanent part of the rear wheel assembly. After the last post by SiriusFun I looked at it again and realized that I could take it off. It was a bear but I got it off. That gave me just enough space to put the bigger sprocket on.

A few small minor hurtles and now I have the new sprocket on and the scooter is much faster. The replacement motor is 650 watts (the original was 900) but even with the smaller motor and the bigger sprocket the acceleration is still pretty with me on the scooter (160 pounds), even going up a small slope. I bet the bigger 900 watt motor could take an even larger sprocket (maybe 19 teeth). At that point I would need to start looking at adding a rear brake.

My two boys are 50 and 65 pounds. For them this puppy accelerates like a rocket! I got some serious dad is great points on our test rides this morning.

So two more questions...
1) Is there a way that I can take the 15 tooth sprocket with the 10mm opening and 8mm step and open it up so that it is 10mm all the way down (so I can put it on the larger motor).
2) Can I add a rear brake on the other threaded side of the rear wheel? How would one pull both brake cables at the same time?

Thanks
Mike
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SiriusFun
Journeyman Modder

Lakewood
Colorado



293 Posts

Posted - 07/29/2009 :  10:08:59  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by mikegerard


So two more questions...
1) Is there a way that I can take the 15 tooth sprocket with the 10mm opening and 8mm step and open it up so that it is 10mm all the way down (so I can put it on the larger motor).
2) Can I add a rear brake on the other threaded side of the rear wheel? How would one pull both brake cables at the same time?

Thanks
Mike



1). I don't think these sprockets are very hard, so you should be able to carefully drill or ream to fit. Keep in mind you are making the hub walls thinner and you will have less material for the threads of the set-screw.

2). Since the hub is threaded on both sides, you can add a disc or band brake. For the disc, you will need to add a screw-on flange and then bolt a disc rotor to that. The very hard part is to get a caliper assembly perfectly aligned with the rotor and securely fastened to the frame. A screw-on drum and band brake would be a lot easier to add. Each brake has it's own cable that goes to it's own brake lever on the handlebars. So you will need a cable and brake lever for the right side.


When you reversed the rear wheel in the frame, does the centerline of the tire still track straight down the centerline of the scooter frame? If not, you may have some "unusual" handling.

Edited:
After re-reading your post, I realized that you may be referring to opening up the bore of the roller clutch assembly. There's a shaft adapter inside the clutch that goes from a 8MM shaft to 12MM to fit the ID of the roller clutch. If you pull the snap ring off the end, the shaft adapter should slide out. I don't think you'll have much luck modifying the existing adapter.






You cannot drill that out to 10mm all the way!


Edited by - SiriusFun on 07/29/2009 12:33:56
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